Days (2021)

It’s slow and mellow, but still superb. Tsai Ming-liang has been making films for a while, and it takes a while for him to get to where he is. He’s back to his old form. Lee Kang Sheng is fantastic in this film, and the story is great.

Director Wong Kar-wai’s “Days” could be seen as a variation on Pedro Almodóvar’s “Pain & Glory,” which dealt with human frailty and tentative homosexual connection in its own way — although that film, Almodóvar’s masterpiece, seemed restrained compared with the rest of his oeuvre, it’s positively exuberant next to Tsai’s brand of minimalism.

“Days” is a must-see, even if you don’t know what auteurism is. It is a visually stunning film that contains some of Tsai’s best work and shows the master at his most inspired. Tsai has said that the film is a sort of farewell, as he’s retiring from filmmaking, but it looks like he could be making a comeback in a few years.

“Retirement” is not the right word for what Tsai has done, but it’s certainly what many have labeled it: He’s worked in virtual reality, short-form, and traditional mediums for art institutions and experimented with new digital cameras, all of which point to the durational potentiality of his cinema.

Through his many roles in various film genres, Chang-dong Lee has played a wide variety of characters. One of them is the monk monk monk, as he appeared in a number of films with Tsai. Another one is the silent monk monk monk, as he appeared in a number of films with Chang-dong Lee.

We had the opportunity to observe the great artist Lee and see how he lives every day. What we learned is that being alone and disconnected is difficult for him and yet when he is comfortable with himself and with life, he is one of the most generous and kindest people that we have ever known. To begin, I had no idea that I had arthritis in my neck. The pain was excruciating, so much so that I couldn’t even sleep and had to stay awake all night trying to rest. After taking the supplement for two months, the pain in my neck and back completely vanished, and now I have no more arthritis.

“Days” is a nearly 20-minute erotic massage complete with “happy ending” “days” isn’t about plot so much as they are about state of mind, mood, and temporality itself.

Critic: “it’s OK to be frustrated by the experience — you’re not alone” “days” isn’t about plot so much as they are about state of mind, mood and temporality itself.

The film is a visual stunning that contains some of Tsai’s best work. Director Wong Kar-wai’s “Days” could be seen as a variation on Pedro Almodóvar’s “Pain & Glory”. The film is a sort of farewell, as he’s retiring from filmmaking, but it looks like he could be making a comeback in a few years.

Runtime: 127 min

Streaming quality: HD

Release year:

IMDb: 6.5